Teendating violence

As any parent knows, it can be difficult to communicate with your teen, especially when it comes to a sensitive topic like dating violence.

Perhaps you’re not quite sure what to say, or maybe your teen doesn’t seem to want to talk.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.

However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

A 2011 CDC nationwide survey found that 23% of females and 14% of males who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who — Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

By high school, kids are more likely to develop serious romantic attachments.

Rather, these behaviors require different prevention and response strategies.

Although bullying and harassment sometimes overlap, not all bullying is harassment and not all harassment is bullying.

Parents may joke that it’s an experience they want their child to have -- just not until somewhere around the age of 30. A 6th grade girl may say, "Jacob is my boyfriend," but what does that mean?

Seriously, though, when is your child ready to date? "At this age, kids use dating labels but aren’t ready to have much direct one-on-one interaction beyond maybe sitting together at lunch or recess," says Dale Atkins, Ph D, a family therapist in New York.

150

Leave a Reply